Fred's Blog
A World War 2 Trilogy - By FRED NATH (Novelist and Neurosurgeon)
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Delivered by FeedBurner


Recent Posts

The Promise
Windrush, Politics and Prejudice
Dr Bawa-Garba and Manslaughter
A Swedish Christmas Recipe
Yorkshire Puddings Anyone?

Most Popular Posts

Fred's Doc Blog
The Trial by Franz Kafka -my personal view.
Dr Bawa-Garba and Manslaughter
How to self-publish your book (Episode 1) - a Quick, Easy Solution!
Trigeminal Neuralgia

Categories

Entertainments
Food
Grumbles
Medical stuff
news
Politics
thoughts
Writing

Archives

May 2018
April 2018
February 2018
December 2016
September 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
January 2016
November 2015
August 2015
March 2014
January 2014
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010

powered by

Fred's Blog

March 2011

Cheap and easy

Well, folks finally joined the e-book community.
Published a Roman adventure on Kindle! Dirt cheap but readable.
You can get the book, called 'Judas Scrolls' here:
It's a bit of a wild romp but does have some serious undercurrents.
A critique from a Scribendi editor said:
"painted a vivid picture with thoughtful characters and clever story development."
Try it!
Can't help wondering whether it's impatience or laziness which makes a writer publish his own books, but hell, why wait?

A killing, a doctor and a Russian ship

Martha and Bishwa settled in London. He purchased a GP practice in Surrey Docks in the south east of London. In those days, there was no NHS and one bought a number of patients from some retiring practitioner. I figure it came as a bit of a shock to my mother who, raised in a small town in Sweden expected status to come with the position of being a local doctor’s wife. In Sweden if you married a doctor you had the title ‘Doctorinna’ or in Europe ‘Doctoresse’, in those days a position of respect. Perhaps she had a rude awakening but in Bermondsey where I grew up, they would laugh if you told them that.

An End to War

The Second World War seems to have been an unrecognised source of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder for many of the survivors. It was not trendy then for men to show their feelings nor was it regarded as ‘manly’ to express the results of the five years of continual stress felt by the many who suffered in that long conflict. Many families will have members who could have recalled much, but chose not to speak of the horrors they experienced. Maybe that was why my father, Bishwa, was never motivated to either write about his experiences nor to discuss how he felt about them.